Start With Why — Chapter 1: Assume You Know

Start With Why

Start With Why

I started read this book and I want to post the more interesting elements that grab my attention. And I’ll do it in bullet form ­čÖé

  • behavior is affected by our assumptions or our perceived truths; we make decisions based on what we think we know. For example; “not too long ago, we all believed that the world was flat, that if we traveled too far we would literally fall of the edge of the earth. It wasn’t until that minor detail was revealed — the world is round — that behaviors changed on a massive scale… The correction of a simple false assumption moved the human race forward.”
  • whatever the result (of our decisions), we make decisions based on a perception of the world that may not, in fact, be completely accurate.
  • so how can we ensure that all our decisions will yield the best results for reasons that are fully within our control? Logic dictates that more information and data are key… More data, however, doesn’t always help, especially if a flawed assumption set the whole process in motion in the first place.”
  • assumptions, even when based on sound research, can lead us astray
  • “… they engineered the outcome they wanted from the beginning. if they didn’t achieve their desired outcome, they understood it was because of a decision they made at the start of the process.”
  • “when faced with a result that doesn’t go according to plan, a series of perfectly effective short-term tactics are used until the desired outcome is achieved. But how structurally sound are those solutions?”
  • “… great leaders understand the value in the things we cannot see.”
  • there are those who decide to manipulate┬á the door to fit to achieve the desired result and there are those who start from somewhere very different. though both courses of action may yield similar short-term results, it is what we can’t see that makes long-term success more predictable for only one: the one that understood why the doors need to fit by design and not be default.”

Half Marathon #2: US Half Marathon

The US Half Marathon on November 4th, 2012 was my 2nd half marathon and boy was it a tough one. The course had a few hills, but that wasn’t why this was a tough race for me. My training for this half marathon wasn’t as good as I had hoped it would be. I had a Vegas trip that made me miss a week of running and I also bought some new basketball shoes that literally tore up my feet, so that took me out for another 2 weeks. I also think that the running program that I was on was a little too aggressive for me. It had a “pace run” once a week and I think that I may have set too ambitious of a goal for only my 2nd half marathon. My goal for this race was 1:45, which is an 8:00 minute mile pace and about 10 minutes quicker than my first half. The reason why I didn’t like this program and the pace runs was because it took out the fun and the freedom from my running. I started thinking about my finish time a little too much and stopped focusing on my love for running. There were a few times during the training that I knew I was over-training, but I decided to push through it thinking that that was the only way that I was going to improve. Over-training: the one thing I caution my own clients about every week, yet it was something I was doing during this training. The good thing is that I learned from this experience. Not that I have strayed too far away from it, but I want to get back to the point I was at when I first read “Born to Run.” I want to love running like I did when I first started running.

 

As for the race, I finished at 2:14:52. There were a couple of times I walked, I tied my shoes a few times, and use the potty once. It wasn’t my cleanest race and I blame it on my lack of proper training leading up to it. But like I said, I learned from this experience and I’m excited to run my next half.

 

I just started training for my 3rd Half Marathon and this time my only goal is to run. Cheers!

 

Mile 10

Mile 10

2012 World Series Game #1

Ok, I know its super late, but I have to post this. Also, my New Years Resolution will be to post something everyday.

So yea, I was at Game 1 of the World Series!! I have to thank my brother, Ben, for talking me into it. I didn’t actually decide ┬áto go until 12pm on game day. There were a few reasons why it took me a long time decide whether or not to go: (1) Tix were $350, (2) we were facing Justin Verlander, (3) I was already at work in San Jose, and (4) TIX WERE $350!!! It took a while for me to finally decide, but I’m glad that I made the decision to go to my first ever World Series. For those of you who didn’t watch Game 1 of the World Series, our 3rd baseman (Pablo Sandoval) had a historic game, hitting 3 homeruns, 2 of which were off of THEE Justin Verlander! Pablo was only the 4th player to hit 3 HRs in the World Series; the other 3 were Babe Ruth, Reggie Jackson, and Albert Pujols. Going into the series, the SFGiants weren’t getting much respect, especially because they were facing probably the most dominating pitcher in the league in Verlander. So to jump on the Tigers and the best pitcher in Game 1, and eventually winning 8-3, was a great accomplishment, and I’m so glad that I was a part of it all.

A panoramic view from our seats at Game 1 of the 2012 World Series

A panoramic view from our seats at Game 1 of the 2012 World Series

Epic

Epic