Thinking For A Change

Focus, Focus, Focus

Thinking For A Change

Thinking For A Change

Skill #2: Unleash the Potential of Focused Thinking

  • “He did each thing as if he did nothing else.” – Spoken of Novelist Charles Dickens (77)
  • Focused thinking can do several things for you: (1) Harness energy toward a desired goal, (2) give ideas time to develop, (3) brings clarity to the target, and (4) take you to the next level. (80-82)
  • Focus can bring energy and power to almost anything, whether physical or mental. (80)
  • “To be able to concentrate for a considerable time is essential to difficult achievement.” – Bertrand Russell (80-81)
  • A good idea can become a great idea when it is given focus time. (81)
  • “knowledge is power only if a man knows what facts are not to bother about.” – Robert Lynd (81)
  • One of the most important things about golf is the presence of clear goals. (82)
  • “The immature mind hops from one thing to another; the mature mind seeks to follow through.” – Harry A. Overstreet (82)
  • Be selective, not exhaustive, in your focused thinking. For me, that means dedicating in-depth thinking time for four areas: leadership, creativity, communication and intentional networking. (83)
  • Identify Your Priorities (84)
  • “a conclusion is a place where you get tired of thinking.” – Edward DeBono (84)
  • Discover Your Gifts (84)
  • if you’re going to focus your thinking in your areas of strength, you need to know what they are.” (85)
  • Develop Your Dream ((85)
  • “You will become as small as your controlling desire, as great as your dominant aspiration.” – James Allen (85)
  • “The real path to greatness, it turns out, requires simplicity and diligence. It requires clarity, not instant illumination. It demands each of us focus on what is vital — and to eliminate all of the extraneous distractions.” – Jim Collins (86)
  • Wherever you are… be there! (87)
  • The mind will not focus until it has clear objectives. But the purpose of goals is to focus your attention and give you direction, not to identify a final destination. (89)
  • “If you can’t write your idea on the back of my business card, you don’t have a clear idea.” – David Belasco (89)
Thinking For A Change

Always Think “Big Picture”

Thinking For A Change

Thinking For A Change

Part I of this book had some really good shtuff in it, but I wasn’t able to make time to write about the key points that stood out to me. I will do a better job for Part II: Eleven Thinking Skills Every Successful Person Needs. I will actually use these types of posts as my “notepad” when I complete the assigned readings for my Leadership & Critical Thinking course. As most of my posts about the books in my “Bookshelf,” I will just report (in bullet form) the more interesting points that I found in each chapter. Hopefully these bullet points serve a purpose for you; whether they be good conversation starters or even serve as “thought provokers.” Definitely, comment on any of these posts with your thoughts and we can have a discussion 🙂 Enjoy!

Skill #1

  • “Where success is concerned, people are not measured in inches, or pounds, or college degrees, or family background; they are measured by the size of their thinking.” – David Schwartz (59)
  • “We all live under the same sky, but we don’t all have the same horizon.” – Konrad Adenauer (61)
  • How many thousands of people had seen what Eratosthenes saw and never made the same connection? (61)
  • When somebody like Jack Welch tells a GE employee that the ongoing relationship with the customer is more important than the sale of an individual product, he’s reminding them of the big picture. (62)
  • Spend time with big-picture thinkers and you’ll find that they: (1) Learn continually, (2) Listen intentionally, (3) Look expansively and (4) Live completely. (63-65)
  • Big-picture thinkers are never satisfied with what they already know…. they often are able to connect the unconnected. They are life-long learners. (63)
  • If I’m going to learn and grow, I must know what questions to ask and know how to apply the answers to my life. (63)
  • Big-picture thinkers recognize that they don’t know lots of things. (64)
  • Big-picture thinkers realize there is a world out there besides their own, and they make an effort to get outside of themselves and see other people’s worlds through their eyes. (64)
  • You can spend your life any way you want, but you can spend it only once. (65)
  • [Big-picture thinkers] experience fewer unwanted surprises, too, because they are more likely to see the many components involved in any given situation: issues, people, relationships, timing and values. They are also, therefore, usually more tolerant of other people and their thinking. (65)
  • Leaders must: (1) See the vision before their people do, (2) Size up situations, taking into account many variables, (3) Sketch a picture of where the team is going, (4) Show how the future connects with the past to make the journey more meaningful, and (5) Seize the moment when the timing is right. (66-67)
  • “He that is everywhere is nowhere.” – Thomas Fuller (67)
  • “You’ve got to think about the ‘big things’ while you’re doing the small things, so that all the small things go in the right direction.” – Alvin Toffler (67)
  • One of the most important skills you can develop in human relations is the ability to see things from the other person’s point of view. (68)
  • see what other see… that is a powerful thing. (68)
  • The better the grasp team members have of the big picture, the greater their potential to work together as a team. (68)
  • The person who forgets the ultimate is a slave to the immediate. (69)
  • With preparation, the most important things will be done well. (69)
  • If you want to cultivate the ability to think big picture, then you must get used to embracing and dealing with complex and diverse ideas. (71)
  • Learn from Every Experience: Failing Forward (71)
  • Teachability is an attitude, a mind-set that says, “No matter how much I know (or think I know), I can learn from this situation.” That kind of thinking can help you turn adversity into advantage. It can make you a winner even during the most difficult circumstances.” (71)
  • If you want to be a big-picture thinker, you will have to go against the flow of the world. (73)
Triple Crown 10K

Triple Crown 10K

You know the routine: after a race, I eat food and drink water and post a picture with a long caption on my IG account. So here’s what I posted on my IG after my 10K today:

Triple Crown 10K

Triple Crown 10K

“4th 10K in the books. This was a very familiar run because I’ve run Lake Merced plenty of times before. The only difference was the direction we ran for this 10K; I usually run counterclockwise, but this race was run clockwise. I placed 1st in my age group and 1st overall in the 10K field!!! Woooo!!! In yo face Usain Bolt!!!  Yea, the field was 4 deep and I was the only male and the youngest female of the group was 46, but hey, shut your mouth :). Now it’s time for a fresh cut before I see the gang. Happy Sunday everyone!

I was really happy with my overall time. Ever since I got this Garmin, I’ve been pushing myself a little harder. This was a faster pace than my 8-miler last week on the same course. I have a crazy week ahead of me, so I hope I can make time to do my runs and get some good rest; we’ll see how that goes. I hope you’re all doing well! Go 9ers!!! Cheers!!

8 miles - Lake Merced

“Long Run” Sunday

8 miles - Lake Merced

8 miles – Lake Merced

This was by far the best Lake Merced Run that I’ve ever had. I’ve run 10 miles around Lake Merced before, but this 8-mile run was fast (to my standards) and I felt so damn good after; I wasn’t too tired, I wasn’t breathing hard, nothing was aching, and I just felt gooooood.

And this is the first time that I used the my Garmin to challenge myself. And what I mean by that is, I set my Garmin to a 8:00 minute pace, whereas in the past I wouldn’t set a desired pace and just used the watch to track my current pace, overall distance and overall time. And to be honest, at the start of my run, I wasn’t sure if I would be able to keep up with that pace, but as I mile 2 came along I was feeling good. And after mile 3, I felt the same. By mile 4 I was in the zone! My strides felt good, my breathing felt good and I just felt goooooood. I’m glad that I used that desired pace function because I think it pushed me and challenged me and it showed me that I can absolutely run an 8:00 minute mile (over 8 miles at least). And to be honest, I think I could have gone another mile or 2 at that 8:00-minute (or faster) pace.

This watch is definitely one of the best Christmas gifts I’ve ever received and I’ve thanked my girlfriend every day since I received it.

Well, that was my “Long Run” Sunday. I’m not gonna lie, I don’t think I’ll post my whole week recap anymore. I’ll keep my running updates short and simple like this post. I hope you all have a great week! Cheers!

Sports Management Handbook

Grad School Starts……. Now

Sports Management Handbook

Sports Management Handbook

So today was Orientation for my Sports Management Program at USF! I’m super excited to start this new chapter in my life and I can’t wait to see where this takes me.

The Orientation went well and I was able to meet a lot of my Cohort. My Cohort (Cohort 38! Woot Woot!) seemed like a really cool bunch and I really think we’re all going to get along and have lots of fun. We all have different backgrounds and experiences that I know will make us a strong and well-rounded Cohort.

There were a few Alumni (and current students) of the program that came to speak and they give us a little insight on what the program did (or is doing) for them and their careers in the Sports Industry. The Alumni were great representatives of the program and they got me even more excited about all the opportunities that will be presented to me, and my Cohort, in the coming months.

Our first class starts tomorrow night and I’m super excited to get started! Grad School, lehhhh goooo!!! Cheers!!!

7 Mile - Lap Times

H.M.T. III – Week 7 Recap

HMT III: Week 7

HMT III: Week 7

Monday 12/31/12

New Year’s Eve!! I spent New Year’s Eve at my Sister’s place and kept it pretty low key because I had a New Year’s Day 10K the following morning. I did take 3 shots of Henny, but my brother-in-law was kind enough to make them half shots because he knew what I had planned that next morning. I didn’t strengthen this day because I wanted to rest my body for the 10K, BUT I did stretch (somewhat). On my way to my sister’s place, I stopped by a running store and bought this bad boy:

The Stick

The Stick

So I was rolling out my quads, calves and IT Band the whole day. After eating and playing with my nieces, I went to sleep around 9pm and asked my sister to wake me up for the countdown…. she forgot! But she did wake me up right after the countdown and I was able to wish all my family Happy New Year.

Tuesday 01/01/13

Check out my New Year’s Day 10K! post.

Wednesday 01/02/13

I was supposed to run, BUT I was still recovering from my 10K, so I just relaxed this day.

Thursday 01/03/13

I did strengthen my back, shoulder and triceps this day. After resistance training, I hopped on the treadmill for my 4.5-mile run and ended up only running half a mile; my legs still weren’t ready after that 10K (that hill was nuts, for me anyways).

10K Elevation Chart

10K Elevation Chart

Friday 01/04/13

Rest Day!!!! Yes please!!!!

Saturday 01/05/13

My lady and I started off this Saturday by volunteering a food bank with a few of my staff from the Y. It was a great experience and we had a lot of fun doing what we were doing. After the food bank we had lunch and after lunch I KTFO!! My body, my legs still needed some good rest.

Sunday 01/06/13

Today was my 7-miler. I wasn’t too sure how this run would go because I haven’t really ran since my 10K and my legs still felt a little tired. Here’s my run:

Lake Merced

Lake Merced

7 Mile - Lap Times

7 Mile – Lap Times

My legs felt really heavy today and I think its because I have been eating way too much Quinoa! I just started eating that shtuff and I have fallen in love with it. I spoke to my buddy about my run today and he told me that Quinoa definitely makes you feel a little heavier. So after I spoke with him, I went to Chipotle and got me a Chicken Fajita Bowl with EXTRA RICE! I think I haven’t been consuming too much carbs this past week (because of Quinoa) and that’s why this 7-miler was a little tougher than usual.

I you haven’t noticed yet, I have posted something every day this year! This is one of my goals for 2013: to post something on my blog everyday! I hope all of your running is going well! Cheers to 2013!!

Wooden on Leadership

Wooden on Leadership — Introduction

Wooden on Leadership

Wooden on Leadership

This is one of the books that I will be reading once I start my Sports Management Program at USF on January 8th. I love reading these types of books so I thought I’d get a headstart. I’m super excited to get started in this program; 2013 is going to be a great year!

Just like my post, “Start With Why — Chapter 1: Assume You Know,” I will bullet point all the parts of each chapter of Wooden on Leadership that I find interesting.

  • Balance is crucial in everything we do. Along with love it’s among the most important things in life. 
  • Leadership is all about helping others achieve their own greatness by helping the organization to succeed.
  • How you run the race — your planning, preparation, practice and performance — counts for everything. Winning or losing is a by-product, an aftereffect, of that effort.
  • Effort is the ultimate measure of your success.
  • COMPETE ONLY AGAINST YOURSELF — Set your standards high; namely, do the absolute best of which you are capable. Focus on running the race rather than winning it. Do those things necessary to bring forth your personal best and don’t lose sleep worrying about the competition. Let the competition lose sleep worrying about you.
  • You must define success as making the complete effort to maximize your ability, skills, and potential in whatever circumstances — good or bad — may exist.
  • My standard of success counted most to me.
  • Before you can lead others, you must be able to lead yourself.
  • Learn to master the 4 P’s: Planning, Preparation, Practice and Performance. These are key to successful execution.
  • Write down the tasks, initiatives, and actions that each member of your team needs to do to perform at his or her peak level.

Training for my 2nd Half Marathon!

So after the Western Pacific Half Marathon, I took a few weeks off from running to rest my feet and legs from all the miles it had covered during training. And then I decided to plan for my 2nd Half Marathon. This time around I decided to follow Hal Higdon’s

Hal Higdon's Half Marathon Novice 2 Program

Hal Higdon’s Half Marathon Novice 2 Program

 

This training program had me set a goal for my 2nd Half Marathon, something that the Novice 1 Program didn’t have me do. I decided to set a goal of 01:45:00, which works out to be an 8-minute pace throughout the course of a Half Marathon. I figured it was a little ambitious, but I went with it.

 

Here are my Instagram posts from my 5K and 10K experiences:

 

Bear Creek Trail 5K

My first race in my Vibrams

My first race in my Vibrams

“Another 5K under our belts. It was my first official race wearing my Vibram KSOs and it sucked!!! Well, not that bad, but it did slow me down a little bit and I got a bruise on the side of my right foot. The “swag” we got at this race was by far the best of all the races we’ve done: 2 shirts, a really nice medal, 2 cans of coke for our gfs (btw, thanks for the support ladies), good post-race food, a purple bag of goodies, etc. And the race cost only $29 to register!! One thing I learned: don’t wear my Vibram KSOs on future trail races. Happy Saturday everyone!!”

Drag-N-Fly Trail 10K

10K #2

10K #2

 

“Drag-N-Fly 10K…. Charlie 2nd overall, 1st in age group = 48:26 (7:19 pace). Me 23rd overall, 4th in age group = 1:02:44 (9:29 pace). This 10K was no joke! I never knew Antioch had hills like the ones we ran up. Definitely one of the tougher races I’ve participated in. S/o to my brother Charlie for running his first official race since his Cross Country days in high school; my homie killlled it. #brazen #brazenracing #dragnfly #10K #run #running”

So those were my most recent races. I was supposed to run the San Jose Rock ‘n Roll Half, but registration was way too expensive. So my next race will be the US Half in San Francisco on November 4th! I haven’t been able to run or work out these past few weeks because I bought of pair of Kobe’s to hoop in and they realllllly messed up my feet. They’re healed now, so I’ll be training hard these next 2 weeks. I hope everyone is running well! Cheers!

My First Half Marathon

The Western Pacific Half Marathon was back in May, but here is what I posted on my Instagram right after I completed the race:

 

Mile 11

 

“It’s still crazy to me that I ran 13.1 miles today. S/o to anyone who completes a full marathon because if you asked me to do what I did today twice, I’d slap you in your face! At mile 8, I felt my right hip flexor acting up, at mile 9 my right ankle stiffened up, and around mile 10 my right knee started hurting, but I pushed through to the end. Time to take it easy with my runs for a month and focus on resistance training more. And again, s/o to my brother Gordon! We did it bro, 13.1 effin’ miles. It’s just the beginning. #getsome #everyday………. Mile 11 of our very first Half Marathon (13.1 miles) and we got smiles on our faces. Trust me fam, if you want to be a runner, you have to learn (or relearn) to enjoy it, you have to want to run, you have to respect your feet, your body and the ground you’re running on. You have to grow to love running. Don’t run for anything other than your love for running; everything else will come: the health, the fitness, the abs, the endurance, etc. Don’t disrespect running by feeling that you HAVE to run! You don’t HAVE to run, you GET to run!!! #BornToRun #everyday #getsome #ypowr”